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Ulcerative Colitis Surgery

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a constant (long haul) incendiary illness. It influences the covering of the internal organ, or colon, and rectum. You may require a medical procedure if:

Other clinical treatment, including medicine, hasn’t made a difference. There might be a danger of disease without medical procedure.

The colon has cracked.

The patient has an extreme, unexpected beginning of the infection.

There’s a ton of dying.

Treatment causes results sufficiently extreme to debilitate the patient’s wellbeing.

Harmful megacolon has set in. In this perilous condition, the muscles of the digestive organ are widened, and the colon can crack.

What Types of Surgery Can Treat Ulcerative Colitis?

There are various methodology. All are significant medical procedure on your stomach related framework. Talk with your PCP about which one they suggest for you.

Hemicolectomy. This is an activity that eliminates part of your colon. There are two sorts, contingent upon where your pain point is:

Right hemicolectomy: Removes the right, or rising, part of your colon. The specialist may likewise take out some different regions, similar to your index and part or the entirety of your center internal organ. They’ll associate what’s left of your colon to your small digestive system.

Left hemicolectomy: Removes the left, or plunging, part of your colon. The specialist will join the privilege and center parts to your rectum. This is the last spot your solid discharges go through on out.

Colectomy. This is a medical procedure to eliminate the whole colon.

Proctocolectomy. This technique eliminates both the colon and rectum.

Proctocolectomy is viewed as the standard treatment when medical procedure for ulcerative colitis is required.

On the off chance that the whole colon is taken out, the specialist may make an opening, or stoma, in the stomach divider. The tip of the lower small digestive tract is brought through the stoma. An outside sack, or pocket, is joined to the stoma. This is known as a perpetual ileostomy. Stools go through this opening and gather in the pocket. The pocket should be worn consistently.

Another strategy is the pelvic pocket or ileal pocket butt-centric anastomosis (IPAA). This system doesn’t need a perpetual stoma. This medical procedure is likewise called a therapeutic proctocolectomy. The patient is as yet ready to kill stool through the rear-end. The colon and rectum are taken out, and the small digestive system is utilized to frame an inward pocket or supply – called a J-pocket – that will fill in as another rectum. This pocket is associated with the rear-end. This strategy is often done in two activities. In the middle of the activities, you’d need an impermanent ileostomy.

The landmass ileostomy, or Kock pocket, is a possibility for individuals who might want their ileostomy changed over to an inward pocket. It’s additionally a possibility for individuals who can’t have IPAA. In this technique, you’ll have a stoma yet no pack. The colon and rectum are taken out, and an inner store is made from the small digestive tract. An opening is made in the stomach divider, and the repository is then joined to the skin with an areola valve. To deplete the pocket, the patient embeds a catheter through the valve into the inside repository. This strategy isn’t not the favored careful treatment for ulcerative patients. It has unsure outcomes and may bring about the requirement for more medical procedure.

Recommended

Recuperation

Hemicolectomy. Hope to remain in the emergency clinic for at any rate a couple of days after medical procedure. In any case, you could be there for as long as seven days. IV liquids will keep you hydrated just after the activity. You’ll be on a fluid eating regimen for 1-3 days. Medication will assist with torment, however you most likely won’t have any desire to do typical exercises for a long time. In the event that you have the open kind, it may take longer. Your primary care physician will most likely disclose to you not to lift anything substantial for about a month and a half.

You should have the option to eat and go to the restroom as ordinary after you recuperate. Be that as it may, everybody recuperates at their own movement, so relax until you feel good. Ask your PCP what’s in store.

Call your PCP if:

You have a fever of 100.4 F or higher.

Your cuts swell or release blood, liquid, or discharge.

Your agony deteriorates.

You struggle relaxing.

You can’t quit hurling.

You actually haven’t crapped 3 days after medical procedure.

There is blood in your stool.

What to Eat After Surgery

Ask your PCP when it’s protected to eat strong suppers. It will require some investment for your digestive organs and gut microbes to process food as ordinary. While you recuperate, your colon may likewise experience difficulty retaining water. Try to drink 8-10 glasses of water or other liquid daily.

You may have:

The runs or more solid discharges

Lack of hydration

Rank or successive gas

To give your gut a rest, your primary care physician may have you follow a low-buildup diet for around 4 a month and a half. This will cause you to have more modest defecations and go less frequently. It removes most fiber just as some dairy. Some “low-buildup” nourishments include:

Fruit purée

Bananas

Bread or toast

Nutty spread

Yogurt

Potatoes

White rice

Cheddar

Pasta

Tofu or meat that is anything but difficult to eat

A few nourishments you ought to maintain a strategic distance from include:

Handled meat like wieners or frankfurter

Nuts

Beans, peas, lentils, and vegetables

What Are the Benefits of Ulcerative Colitis Surgeries?

On the off chance that the whole colon and rectum are taken out, ulcerative colitis is relieved. This should stop the looseness of the bowels, stomach agony, frailty, and different side effects.

Likewise, this medical procedure forestalls colon malignant growth. Generally, an expected 5% of ulcerative colitis patients will get malignant growth. Eliminating the colon malignant growth danger is particularly huge for individuals who have ulcerative colitis that influences the whole colon. In these cases, rather than instances of ulcerative colitis that influence just the lower colon and the rectum, the malignant growth hazard without a medical procedure could be up to multiple times the typical rate.

Recommended

What Are the Complications of Ulcerative Colitis Surgeries?

Entanglements from ileoanal anastomosis may include:

More incessant and more watery solid discharges

Aggravation of the pocket (pouchitis)

Blockage of the digestive tract (inside impediment) from inward scar tissue, called grips, brought about by medical procedure

Pocket disappointment, which occurs inside 5 years in around four out of each 100 patients with IPAA

In the event that your pocket fizzles, you’ll need a perpetual ileostomy.

A hemicolectomy has a portion of similar dangers as different medical procedures. Your primary care physician will give you sedation to take care of you. It’s safe for a great many people, yet you could have a response that causes you to feel debilitated for a couple of days. It’s uncommon, yet a few people may feel mistook for a week or somewhere in the vicinity.

You could likewise get blood clusters in your legs or lungs. To diminish the odds of this, a specialist or medical attendant will get you to stroll around consistently in your clinic room.

Other potential issues include:

Contamination

Scar tissue that can hinder your digestion tracts

Spillage where the digestive organs are reconnected

Hernia

Injury to close by organs

Inward dying

Aftercare

Your primary care physician will need to perceive how you are getting along after medical procedure. Converse with them about when you should return. They may need you to visit inside a long time. In any case, your test timetable could be unique, contingent upon why you required the strategy.

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a constant (long haul) incendiary illness. It influences the covering of the internal organ, or colon, and rectum. You may require a medical procedure if:

Other clinical treatment, including medicine, hasn’t made a difference. There might be a danger of disease without medical procedure.

The colon has cracked.

The patient has an extreme, unexpected beginning of the infection.

There’s a ton of dying.

Treatment causes results sufficiently extreme to debilitate the patient’s wellbeing.

Harmful megacolon has set in. In this perilous condition, the muscles of the digestive organ are widened, and the colon can crack.

What Types of Surgery Can Treat Ulcerative Colitis?

There are various methodology. All are significant medical procedure on your stomach related framework. Talk with your PCP about which one they suggest for you.

Hemicolectomy. This is an activity that eliminates part of your colon. There are two sorts, contingent upon where your pain point is:

Right hemicolectomy: Removes the right, or rising, part of your colon. The specialist may likewise take out some different regions, similar to your index and part or the entirety of your center internal organ. They’ll associate what’s left of your colon to your small digestive system.

Left hemicolectomy: Removes the left, or plunging, part of your colon. The specialist will join the privilege and center parts to your rectum. This is the last spot your solid discharges go through on out.

Colectomy. This is a medical procedure to eliminate the whole colon.

Proctocolectomy. This technique eliminates both the colon and rectum.

Proctocolectomy is viewed as the standard treatment when medical procedure for ulcerative colitis is required.

On the off chance that the whole colon is taken out, the specialist may make an opening, or stoma, in the stomach divider. The tip of the lower small digestive tract is brought through the stoma. An outside sack, or pocket, is joined to the stoma. This is known as a perpetual ileostomy. Stools go through this opening and gather in the pocket. The pocket should be worn consistently.

Another strategy is the pelvic pocket or ileal pocket butt-centric anastomosis (IPAA). This system doesn’t need a perpetual stoma. This medical procedure is likewise called a therapeutic proctocolectomy. The patient is as yet ready to kill stool through the rear-end. The colon and rectum are taken out, and the small digestive system is utilized to frame an inward pocket or supply – called a J-pocket – that will fill in as another rectum. This pocket is associated with the rear-end. This strategy is often done in two activities. In the middle of the activities, you’d need an impermanent ileostomy.

The landmass ileostomy, or Kock pocket, is a possibility for individuals who might want their ileostomy changed over to an inward pocket. It’s additionally a possibility for individuals who can’t have IPAA. In this technique, you’ll have a stoma yet no pack. The colon and rectum are taken out, and an inner store is made from the small digestive tract. An opening is made in the stomach divider, and the repository is then joined to the skin with an areola valve. To deplete the pocket, the patient embeds a catheter through the valve into the inside repository. This strategy isn’t not the favored careful treatment for ulcerative patients. It has unsure outcomes and may bring about the requirement for more medical procedure.

Recommended

Recuperation

Hemicolectomy. Hope to remain in the emergency clinic for at any rate a couple of days after medical procedure. In any case, you could be there for as long as seven days. IV liquids will keep you hydrated just after the activity. You’ll be on a fluid eating regimen for 1-3 days. Medication will assist with torment, however you most likely won’t have any desire to do typical exercises for a long time. In the event that you have the open kind, it may take longer. Your primary care physician will most likely disclose to you not to lift anything substantial for about a month and a half.

You should have the option to eat and go to the restroom as ordinary after you recuperate. Be that as it may, everybody recuperates at their own movement, so relax until you feel good. Ask your PCP what’s in store.

Call your PCP if:

You have a fever of 100.4 F or higher.

Your cuts swell or release blood, liquid, or discharge.

Your agony deteriorates.

You struggle relaxing.

You can’t quit hurling.

You actually haven’t crapped 3 days after medical procedure.

There is blood in your stool.

What to Eat After Surgery

Ask your PCP when it’s protected to eat strong suppers. It will require some investment for your digestive organs and gut microbes to process food as ordinary. While you recuperate, your colon may likewise experience difficulty retaining water. Try to drink 8-10 glasses of water or other liquid daily.

You may have:

The runs or more solid discharges

Lack of hydration

Rank or successive gas

To give your gut a rest, your primary care physician may have you follow a low-buildup diet for around 4 a month and a half. This will cause you to have more modest defecations and go less frequently. It removes most fiber just as some dairy. Some “low-buildup” nourishments include:

Fruit purée

Bananas

Bread or toast

Nutty spread

Yogurt

Potatoes

White rice

Cheddar

Pasta

Tofu or meat that is anything but difficult to eat

A few nourishments you ought to maintain a strategic distance from include:

Handled meat like wieners or frankfurter

Nuts

Beans, peas, lentils, and vegetables

What Are the Benefits of Ulcerative Colitis Surgeries?

On the off chance that the whole colon and rectum are taken out, ulcerative colitis is relieved. This should stop the looseness of the bowels, stomach agony, frailty, and different side effects.

Likewise, this medical procedure forestalls colon malignant growth. Generally, an expected 5% of ulcerative colitis patients will get malignant growth. Eliminating the colon malignant growth danger is particularly huge for individuals who have ulcerative colitis that influences the whole colon. In these cases, rather than instances of ulcerative colitis that influence just the lower colon and the rectum, the malignant growth hazard without a medical procedure could be up to multiple times the typical rate.

Recommended

What Are the Complications of Ulcerative Colitis Surgeries?

Entanglements from ileoanal anastomosis may include:

More incessant and more watery solid discharges

Aggravation of the pocket (pouchitis)

Blockage of the digestive tract (inside impediment) from inward scar tissue, called grips, brought about by medical procedure

Pocket disappointment, which occurs inside 5 years in around four out of each 100 patients with IPAA

In the event that your pocket fizzles, you’ll need a perpetual ileostomy.

A hemicolectomy has a portion of similar dangers as different medical procedures. Your primary care physician will give you sedation to take care of you. It’s safe for a great many people, yet you could have a response that causes you to feel debilitated for a couple of days. It’s uncommon, yet a few people may feel mistook for a week or somewhere in the vicinity.

You could likewise get blood clusters in your legs or lungs. To diminish the odds of this, a specialist or medical attendant will get you to stroll around consistently in your clinic room.

Other potential issues include:

Contamination

Scar tissue that can hinder your digestion tracts

Spillage where the digestive organs are reconnected

Hernia

Injury to close by organs

Inward dying

Aftercare

Your primary care physician will need to perceive how you are getting along after medical procedure. Converse with them about when you should return. They may need you to visit inside a long time. In any case, your test timetable could be unique, contingent upon why you required the strategy.

SURGERY FOR ULCERATIVE COLITIS (UC)
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Crohn’s & Colitis UK | www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk
• Colectomy with ileo-rectal anastomosis
This operation is much less common as it is only suitable for a small number
of people with UC. In this the colon is removed, but instead of creating an
ileostomy, the surgeon joins the end of the small intestine directly to the rectum.
This avoids the need for an ileostomy. However, this operation will only be
recommended if there is little or no inflammation in the rectum and no long-term
risk of developing rectal cancer.

SURGERY FOR ULCERATIVE COLITIS (UC)
6
Crohn’s & Colitis UK STOMAS
As described above, sometimes in surgery for UC the intestine is brought to the
surface of the abdomen and an opening is made so that digestive waste products
(liquid or faeces) drain into a bag, rather than through the anus. Because the part
of the intestine brought to the surface is the ileum (the lower end of the small
intestine), this procedure, and the end of the intestine connected to the opening,
is known as an ileostomy. In some operations for certain other conditions,
including Crohn’s Disease, the large intestine or colon is brought to the surface
and connected in a similar way, and this is known as a colostomy. Both types of
opening are also called stomas.
Most stomas are about the size of a 50p piece and pinkish red in colour. Because
the contents of the small bowel are liquid and might irritate the skin, an ileostomy
usually has a short spout of tissue, about 2-3cm in length. Depending on the type
of stoma bag used, ileostomy bags usually have to be emptied four to six times a
day and changed two or three times a week.
An ileostomy showing the stoma opening
• Colectomy with ileo-rectal anastomosis
This operation is much less common as it is only suitable for a small number
of people with UC. In this the colon is removed, but instead of creating an
ileostomy, the surgeon joins the end of the small intestine directly to the rectum.
This avoids the need for an ileostomy. However, this operation will only be
recommended if there is little or no inflammation in the rectum and no long-term
risk of developing rectal cancer.

Some of the operations outlined above, including pouch surgery, may now be
carried out using laparoscopy (minimally invasive surgery). This is also known as
‘keyhole surgery’. Instead of making one large opening in the wall of the abdomen,
the surgeon makes four or five small incisions (cuts) each only about 1cm (half an
inch) long. Small tubes are passed through these incisions and a harmless gas
is pumped in to inflate the abdomen slightly and give the surgeon more space. A
laparoscope, a thin tube containing a light and a camera, is used to relay images
of the inside of the abdomen to a video screen in the operating theatre. Small
surgical instruments can also be passed through the incisions and guided to the
right place using the view from the laparoscope. If a section of the intestine needs
to be removed, this can be done through a separate larger incision.
I found it quite daunting leaving
hospital after my surgery and
having to change the stoma bag
myself. But the stoma nurses
showed me how to do it, and
they were an absolute lifeline to
me even after I left the hospital.
I could contact them whenever
I was unsure about something
which was so reassuring.
Amy, age 35
diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis in 2012
SURGERY FOR ULCERATIVE COLITIS (UC)
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Crohn’s & Colitis UK | www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk
Laparoscopic operations tend to take longer than ‘open’ surgery, but can have a
number of advantages, such as:
• less pain after the operation
• smaller scars
• faster recovery – for example, being able to eat and drink more quickly after the
operation
• reduced risk of a wound infection or a hernia,
• a shorter stay in hospital.
However, laparoscopic surgery may not be available in all centres, and may not be
appropriate if you have already had abdominal surgery.
ARE THERE RISKS TO SURGERY?
Ulcerative Colitis is a very individual condition and the risks and benefits of
different types of treatment will vary from person to person. Your IBD team should
be able to help you weigh up what will be best for you.
Surgery for UC, like all surgery, will carry some general risks, including those linked
to having a general anaesthetic. There is also a small risk that some operations
may lead to complications such as infections. Particular operations may have
other risks. For example, occasionally an anastomosis (join) or an ileo-anal pouch
can develop a leak. Adhesions (sticky bands of scar tissue that form as part of
the healing process) can twist the intestine. If you have a pouch there is also a
risk that you may develop pouchitis (inflammation of the pouch), which may need
treatment with antibiotics. Your surgical team will be able to tell you more about
complications like these, how likely they are for the operation planned for you, and
how they are usually treated.
WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF SURGERY?
Unlike Crohn’s Disease, which can recur after surgery, Ulcerative Colitis cannot
recur once the colon has been removed, and so is ‘cured’ by surgery. This should
mean:
• relief from pain
• relief from symptoms such as urgency or diarrhoea
• being able to stop taking drugs which may be causing side effects
• feeling able to lead a fuller life, for example being able to leave the house in a
more relaxed frame of mind.
Getting used to having a stoma or a pouch will take time, and for some, can be
a challenge. However, many people who have had such operations feel that, in
general, they have a better quality of life than before their surgery.

WHAT CAN I EXPECT TO HAPPEN BEFORE THE OPERATION?
If the surgery is elective (planned), you will have time to talk through the options with
your health care team and to discuss the best way to prepare for the operation. It
is important that you are as fit as possible before having the surgery. So, if you are
seriously underweight you may be advised to take extra nutrients, perhaps in the
form of a special liquid feed as a supplement to your diet. If you smoke, you will be
advised to stop.
Exact procedures vary from hospital to hospital, but you will probably be asked
to attend a pre-admission clinic for a health check a week or two before your
admission. During this appointment a doctor or nurse will examine you and ask
about your general health as well as your UC symptoms. They will take a blood
sample for routine tests and may send you for other tests such as a chest x-ray or
ECG (a tracing of your heart rhythms). This information will help the anaesthetist
plan the best anaesthetic for you.
A surgeon will meet you to discuss your operation and you may be asked to sign a
consent form at this stage (or this may not happen until you are actually admitted
to hospital). It is important that you fully understand what operation is planned and
what are the likely benefits and side-effects. Your surgeon is also likely to explain
about the complications that can happen as a result of surgery. Do ask questions
if you feel you do not understand anything, or would like more information. You
may also meet a colorectal nurse, and, if you are going to have a stoma, a stoma
care nurse, who will also be able to help with any queries you may have about the
operation or your after care.
Once in hospital you may expect something like the following to happen.
• A doctor will examine you and a nurse will check your temperature, blood
pressure, pulse and weight. This information can then be compared with readings
taken after the operation.
• If there is a possibility that you may need a stoma, a stoma care nurse will visit
you to talk through what this may mean for you, and to make sure you have all the
information you need. She should be able to tell you, for example, where (if you
are going to have one) the stoma is likely to be, and may make a mark on your
abdomen to show this.
• If you have not already done so, you will be asked to sign a consent form to
confirm that you agree to the operation. If anything is unclear, ask for it to be
explained. If you don’t want the surgery to happen you have a right not to sign the
form.
• An anaesthetist will visit you to talk about how you will be given the anaesthetic
and how your pain will be controlled after the operation. Good pain relief helps
recovery, so this will be an important part of your post-operative (after the
operation) care.
• You may need to take a ‘bowel preparation’ (a strong laxative) the day before the
operation. This is to make sure that the bowel is completely empty. Or, you may be
asked to have an enema to clear the last part of the bowel.
• You will usually be given a pair of support stockings to wear during and after the
operation, and you may be given a small injection as well. Both these measures
help prevent blood clots in the legs.
SURGERY FOR ULCERATIVE COLITIS (UC)
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Crohn’s & Colitis UK | www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk
WHAT CAN I EXPECT TO HAPPEN AFTER THE OPERATION?
Immediately after the operation you will be moved into the recovery room,
where your condition can be closely monitored. Once you have fully regained
consciousness you will be moved to a ward.
You will be given pain relief, perhaps through an epidural (a fine tube attached to
your back) or intravenously (through a drip in your arm, into a vein). The delivery of
the pain-killing drugs may be automatic, or you may be able to control it by pressing
a hand-held button. You may also be given medication to control anaesthetic side
effects such as nausea and vomiting.
There may be several other tubes coming out of your body, including a drip to
provide fluids, a catheter to drain and measure urine, and a drain tube near the
operation wound. Some people will also have a nasogastric tube (a tube in your nose
to keep your stomach empty). These tubes will be removed over the next few days
and you should be able to start taking painkillers by mouth if you need them. You
may find your throat feels sore from the breathing tube used during the operation.
Gargles can usually help ease this.
Depending on the operation you have had, you may be encouraged to get out of bed
and into a chair the day after, or in some cases, the same day as your surgery. This
is to help get your circulation moving. As you continue to recover, a physiotherapist
may visit you to show you some simple leg and chest exercises.
Also depending on the type of surgery performed, some people will be allowed to
start drinking water within hours of their operation. Others may be asked to wait
until bowel sounds are heard and they have begun to pass wind. So, it may be a few
days before you can start taking fluids and you may need to build up from small sips
to drinking normally. You will then be encouraged to start eating a light diet.
If you have a stoma, the stoma care nurse will show you how to look after it and how
to manage your stoma bag. If you have any problems, don’t hesitate to ask for help.
Some people have found that a few days after the surgery they do not feel as well as
they did immediately after the operation and can feel quite depressed. This may be
partly a reaction to the ‘shock’ of the operation, and this experience usually passes.

HOW LONG WILL I NEED TO STAY IN HOSPITAL?
This can vary quite a lot according to the type of operation needed and also from
individual to individual. Most people stay in hospital for about a week, although if
you have had a laparoscopic (keyhole) operation you may be allowed to go home
earlier. If you have had open surgery you may need to stay a few days longer. In
general, hospital stays for planned or elective surgery tend to be shorter than for
emergency surgery, as people who need emergency surgery are usually more unwell
and may have a more complicated recovery.
HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE TO RECOVER?
When you first go home you will probably find that you feel weak and tire easily. You
may not feel like doing much. On the other hand, you should no longer have the
symptoms from your UC, and, as you recover, should begin to feel a lot better than
before the operation

As time passes you will regain your strength and stamina, and will probably be able
to return to your normal daily activities including sports and hobbies. Everyone
is different, however, and how long this takes can depend not on only the type of
operation you have had, but also on your age and your general state of health.
During your recovery it is important to strike a balance between trying to do more
each day and over-doing things. Listen to your body and only do as much as feels
comfortable.
A gentle exercise program may help speed up your recovery and you will probably be
given some advice on this by the hospital or your IBD team.
If you have a stoma bag, it will take time to learn how to manage it. Talk to the
stoma care nurses if you have a problem or need more information. Many hospitals
have ongoing stoma clinics or offer a stoma care advice line run by the stoma care
nurses, to help with any problems that develop once you are home. Specialist stoma
or IBD nurses should also be able to help with advice about living with an ileo-anal
pouch. You may also find patient associations helpful. (For more details, see Other
Organisations.)
Most people are advised not to do any heavy lifting or housework such as ironing or
vacuuming for a period of time following their operation. You should not start to drive
again until you are able to control a car properly, including making an emergency
stop if you need to, and this may take several months. Your car insurance may not
cover you if you drive before you are fully recovered.
When you can return to work will depend on the operation you have had and the
type of work you do. People with jobs that involve a lot of physical effort may need
more time off than those with less active jobs, although even sitting at a desk all day
can be very tiring after surgery. In general, it usually takes about two to three months
before most people feel able to return to work.
HOW MIGHT AN OPERATION AFFECT MY EVERYDAY LIFE?
• Diet
Immediately after your operation you may need to eat an easy to digest ‘low
residue’ diet. Your hospital will give you details of this. Once you have recovered
you may find that you can eat larger meals and a wider range of foods. Eating
a balanced and nutritious diet should help you recover and then keep up your
general health.
Many people with a stoma do not need to stay on a special diet, but you may find
it helps to take extra fluids (including an electrolyte mix), and you may prefer to
avoid certain foods. High fibre and spicy foods can be a particular problem for
people with an ileostomy. Eating starchy foods such as white bread and rice can
sometimes help improve stoma or pouch function. Your stoma care nurse or the
hospital dietitian should be able to advise you.
Our booklet, Food and IBD, has further information on diet and Ulcerative Colitis.
• Sex and Pregnancy
Most people are able to resume sexual activity after surgery for Ulcerative Colitis,
although it may take a little time, perhaps several months, to recover fully. In men,
operations on the rectum can occasionally lead to impotence. This may resolve
itself – if not there are several aids and medicines which can help. There is some
research to show that both of the main operations most commonly carried out for
UC, but especially IPAA surgery, can affect fertility in women. Couples who may
want to have a family after UC surgery should discuss this with their consultant.
Doctors also usually recommend that a woman with a stoma or pouch gives birth
by caesarean section. For more details see our information sheets, Fertility and
IBD and Pregnancy and IBD.
SURGERY FOR ULCERATIVE COLITIS (UC)
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Crohn’s & Colitis UK | www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk
• Emotional reactions
Everyone reacts to surgery in their own way and some people experience a range
of emotions, both before and then after an operation. You may feel apprehension,
doubt, acceptance, relief, confidence, a sense of wellbeing and perhaps even
some disappointment. It is not uncommon for people with an operation scar or a
stoma to feel depressed about their changed body image. This can be a time of
worry for family members as well.
You may find it helpful to talk to someone about these feelings. Stoma care and
IBD nurses can be an excellent source of support. If you would like to speak to a
professional counsellor, check whether your GP has a counselling service. There
may also be a counsellor attached to your IBD team or hospital. Our information
sheet, Counselling for IBD, has more details on how to find a counsellor. We also
provide a confidential supportive listening service, as well as an information line.
See below for details of these services.
HELP AND SUPPORT FROM CROHN’S AND COLITIS UK
All our information sheets and booklets are available to download from our
website: www.crohnsandcolitis.org.uk. If you would like a printed copy, please
contact our information line – details below.
Crohn’s and Colitis UK Information Line: 0300 222 5700. Open Monday to
Friday, 9 am to 5 pm, except Thursday open 9 am to 1 pm, and excluding English
bank holidays. An answer phone and call back service operates outside these
hours. You can also contact the service by email [email protected]
or letter (addressed to our St Albans office). Trained Information Officers provide
callers with clear and balanced information on a wide range of issues relating to
IBD.
Crohn’s and Colitis Support: 0121 7379 931: Open Monday to Friday, 1 pm
to 3.30 pm and 6.30 pm to 9 pm, excluding English bank holidays. This is a
confidential, supportive listening service, which is provided by trained volunteers
and available to anyone affected by IBD. These volunteers are skilled in providing
emotional support to anyone who needs a safe place to talk about living with IBD.
OTHER ORGANISATIONS
• IA – The Ileostomy and Internal Pouch Support Group: 0800 018 4724
Website:
•Colostomy Association: 0800 328 4257
Website:
Crohn’s and Colitis UK 2014
Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis Edition 3
Last review: July 2014
Charity contact details updated: April 2016
Next planned review: 2017

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